Labels vs SDS: Why Is There Sometimes a Discrepancy?
You may have observed that the notices and warnings on the label for an EPA registered chemical product don't always match what is included in the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). 

For example, the label for Disinfectant Spray Plus (DSP) lists the following "active ingredients":  o-Phenylphenol and Diisobutylphenoxyethoxy ethyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride monohydrate. However, the SDS for this product lists isopropyl alcohol. 

In fact, DSP contains all three of these ingredients. This apparent discrepancy reflects the differing concerns of the two agencies. Here’s how: 

The product label is controlled by EPA, which requires that only the identity of the “active germ killing” agents appear on the label. All other ingredients are listed as “Inerts.”

The SDS is regulated by OSHA. Their requirement is any hazardous material present above 1%, or any carcinogen present above 0.1%, appear in section 3 of the Safety Data Sheet.

For some products, the germ killing agents and the hazardous or carcinogenic materials are the same thing. But not always. When they’re not the same, the label and the SDS will differ. 

To understand the ingredients in our products, it is important to read both the label and the SDS. If you have any questions about Legend Brands products, don’t hesitate to use our online chat service or email our technical experts at support@legendbrandsrestoration.com.